Tag Archives: David Madden

Emilie’s 2010 Best List

I’ve been thinking about this post in the back of my head for the last few weeks. And now it’s come time to look back at my favorites of the year…

Books are pretty easy because I read fewer books this year than…ever. At least, any year since I’ve been keeping track and that’s a decade’s worth of reading. The last time I read fewer than 100 books in a year was my second year of grad school and I read considerably fewer than 100 books this year. So my quantity was down, but not the quality – a read quite a few books this year that I’d had on my to-read list a while.

1. Kai Meyer‘s The Dark Reflections Trilogy and most of The Wave Walkers Trilogy
2. Rebecca Cantrell‘s A Trace of Smoke
3. Audrey Niffennegger‘s The Time Traveler’s Wife
4. John Kennedy Toole‘s A Confederacy of Dunces
5. Alice Sebold‘s The Lovely Bones
6. David Madden‘s Abducted by Circumstance
7. Mary McMyne‘s Wait. (manuscript)
8. Suzanne Collins‘s last Hunger Games book Mockingjay
9. M.O. Walsh‘s The Prospect of Magic
10. Stieg Larsson‘s Millennium Trilogy (still working on the last, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest)

In the interests of full disclosure, I have some reservations about labeling some of these “best,” as I had some issues with a few of these books – notably Stieg Larsson’s books and The Lovely Bones – but they are unconditionally the ones that I invested the most time in, spent time thinking about. And there are some absolutely stellar BEST books on this list. And, of course, I read dozens of short stories through my work with Narrative, several of which I’d love to put on a best list, but can’t disclose. Interestingly, there’s no non-fiction on my list this year.

I actually saw quite a few movies in the theater this year, or maybe they stand out because I quite liked so many that I saw there. Rentals were often disappointing – slightly better than I’d expected or boring or not as good as I’d heard. So this is tough, but the movies I enjoyed the most this year:

1. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 (I have to do it, it was so good…)
2. Inception (I saw it 3.5 times in the theater)
3. Toy Story 3 (Pixar has always been really smart with these sequels)
4. Easy A (it was as funny and good as my favorite 80s comedies)
5. Red (it was like Sneakers jacked up, so of course I loved it)
6. Exit Through the Gift Shop (of course, it’s about Banksy)
7. Going the Distance, Get Him to the Greek (a tie)
8. Twilight: Eclipse and How to Train Your Dragon (a tie)
9. Nine (I love musicals)
10. The Kids are Alright

Honorable mentions: Last Station, Hereafter, Black Swan, True Grit, Despicable Me, The Ramen Girl, St. Trinian’s, Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog, The Young Victoria and Coco Before Chanel.

TV had to take a serious back burner this year because I never knew when I’d get home from work and had so much going on. This list is basically comprised of the shows that I kept up with in the chaos. Also, it should be said that I watched every episode of Law & Order SVU through Season 10 this year.

1. So You Think You Can Dance
2. Survivor
3. Castle
4. Glee
5. Raising Hope
6. Dancing with the Stars
7. United States of Tara
8. How I Met Your Mother
9. Bones
10. Fringe

My super notables:  The Tudors, In Plain Sight and 30 Rock.

I might go so far as to say that music was one of my biggest influences this year. I probably went to more concerts this year than I have every other year combined. Because my favorite songs are generally still my favorite songs from last year and the year before (with a few new exceptions), I’d much rather outline the best concerts of the year and the cds that I’ve been listening to obsessively.

CDs:

1. Lissie‘s Catching a Tiger, as well as her EP Why You Runnin’
2. Roisin Murphy‘s Ruby Blue
3. Mark Growden‘s Saint Judas
4. The Dresden Dolls‘s Yes, Virginia…
5. Black Gold‘s Rush

Shows:

1. Dresden Dolls at Tipitina’s in New Orleans
2. Black Gold at Howlin’ Wolf in New Orleans
3. Citizen Cope at Howlin’ Wolf in New Orleans
4. Simon Lott at Hi Ho Lounge in New Orleans
5. Mark Growden at Circle Bar in New Orleans

I think that just about covers the highlights of 2010, so all that’s left to say is Happy 2011!

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Filed under books, movies, music, New Orleans, pop culture, t.v., what I'm reading

Taking a strong circumstance

My newest 225 Magazine piece is up on the website. This one is a profile of David Madden’s new book Abducted By Circumstance.

In really sad news, a little birdie just told me that it looks like the 2010 Louisiana Book Festival will be canceled. Time for an enormous half million dollar fundraiser, y’all. We can do it. Me? I pledge to volunteer my time and I’ll draft two or three of my friends. No, FIVE! Just don’t cancel the festival!

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Filed under book news, books, literature, writing updates

Where Y’At?

Last week, I got a gig working on a film and I’ll be doing this for a bit. Film jobs have their ups and downs, but all in all, I am really, really glad to be back on another show. The company is great (and it better be, with 12-hr days!) and it just really gets my blood going.

Jamey always says the universe gives you what you want and you’d just better be clear on what you want. I’ve taken liberties with what she says, but I think the message is generally correct. 🙂 Shortly before this gig came up, I was telling a friend in a coffee shop, “My whole body hurts when I see movie vans and I’m not working on a show.” So, the universe gave me what I needed and I’m glad it did.

The bounty of my Netflix queue offered up Cirque du Freak: The Vampire’s Assistant, which started filming at the tail end of The Final Destination, just a few blocks from us. Then, on Friday, at the end of my long-ass work week, I got my issue of Entertainment Weekly. The Summer Movie Preview issue, no less, which highlighted two movies filmed in New Orleans, around the same time: Jonah Hex and The Expendables. I see that Jonah Hex filmed at Lafayette #1, a cemetery near my house. I’ll be looking for that now.

So that’s where I’m at lately. I’ll carve out some time for the book, somehow, because I’m this close to finishing it. This close means I’m at page 231 of what will be about a 300 page manuscript.

Today, I swung by the Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Society’s Meet the Authors event, which featured some friends of mine. David Madden was representing his newest book, Abducted By Circumstance, and also a story that had been reprinted in Best of LSU Fiction, edited by Nolde Alexius and Judy Kahn. Then, there was presentation by Scott Ellis, author of Madame Vieux Carre and Elise Blackwell read from her newest novel, An Unfinished Score.

Let me tell you about this event. You’d kinda have to know about New Orleans in order to fully appreciate what I’m about to tell you. If you do know New Orleans, imagine the prettiest day imaginable. Bright sun, but not too hot. Absolutely clear, a sweet breeze blowing in. Lots of tourists, but not too many. You’re in the Cabildo, the upstairs room with all the windows overlooking Jackson Square and past that, the little amphitheater that’s on the river side of Decatur, right on the levee. Everything is beautiful and happy, for a moment out of time. You’re in a room with writers you admire and some you know and love. Everybody’s got new books (which you buy, that’s what credit cards are for), everybody’s dressed for spring, everybody’s digging the mint julep tea. Then, Elise Blackwell reads from her book, about a viola player, about music, and from the square below, teeming with Tarot and palm readers, musicians and street performers, an unseen man starts singing opera in this big, round voice that reaches up into the room, dueting with Elise’s voice perfectly. That’s what happy is. That’s what New Orleans is.

And then, there’s always Stanley’s afterward, with Maurice. And a few hours after that, there’s gonna be watching Treme at a great bar with friends. Actually, that second part would be in about an hour, y’all, I got to get going…

But before I do, here’s some pictures, cause you know I’m all about giving you presents.

David and I

Judy Kahn, Scott Ellis, David Madden, Elise Blackwell, Nolde Alexius

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Filed under book news, bragging on, Friends, literature, music, New Orleans, writing updates

Some bragging on and some poetry

This is an extra cool bragging on post, for me, for a couple of different reasons. First, it involves two of my mentors and former bosses. I was lucky enough to see earlier versions of both of the works while they were still evolving. And both of them are poets and taught me a lot about poetry, at a time (like I mentioned in my last post) when poetry was a larger part of my life.

I receive a Christmas card from Ava Leavell Haymon every year. Not just any Christmas card, but a card with one of Ava’s poems and some artwork behind it. She works really hard on them, as I know firsthand since I worked for her. I didn’t get one this year. 😦 Or, I thought I didn’t. A few days ago, I opened up a belated Christmas card from Ava and her husband Cordell. On the back, they’d jokingly had printed:

Happy Holidays

Happy New Year

Happy Groundhog Day

All the best wishes, all the time-Cordell and Ava

It made me laugh. But even better than the sweet joke was the fine print beneath it informing me that her newest book of poetry is out at the end of the month from LSU Press. Why the House Is Made of Gingerbread was a manuscript when I was working for Ava and it contained some of my favorites of her poetry. It’s a rumination on the Hansel and Gretel fairy tale, focusing on Gretel’s perspective. I always suspected Ava was a bit influenced by Russia’s Baba Yaga tales as well, but that could’ve been because I was studying them in my Russian fairy tales class at around the same time. The poems captured my imagination and I can’t wait to get my hands on the finished book. The first book event is at the Baton Rouge Gallery on February 28th.

I was an undergraduate when Jim Wilcox, concerned because I was working nights at a hotel and going to classes during the day, said, “You know, David Madden is looking for a new assistant.” So, I was introduced to David and got the gig and…worked two jobs in addition to going to classes. I kinda loved my night job at the hotel. I got so much reading and studying done! I continued to work for and with David for years. When I tried to quit as his assistant to focus on graduate school, he made me an offer I couldn’t refuse–partnership in his literary agency, which I had been working on in addition to other duties. So then David and I were partners for a few years and because of that experience, I got to see books like Mary Manhein’s Trail of Bones, Richard White’s Kingfish and David’s own Thomas Wolfe’s Civil War and A Primer of the Novel go from manuscripts to published books I was proud of participating it.

David’s newest book, Abducted By Circumstance, is particularly special to me because I was still working for him when he wrote the first version of  “Abducted By Circumstances.” That version has traveled a far distance to become his new novel – not just as indicated by the setting, which is now the Thousand Islands of New York, but thematically and stylistically as well. David says I was the first person to read that first short piece and I clearly remember letting myself into his house one day for work and he, consumed with creative energy, asked me to take a seat, then read me what he’d been working on. Seeing now that it’ll soon be published, I feel like I’m witnessing the full arch of something profound. David always inspires me.

The cover and plot details aren’t available on Amazon.com, but I found the cover and blurbs on an interesting blog and you can read the plot details and pre-order by clicking the link in the above paragraph for the University of Tennessee Press.

[3.4.10 Update: David asked me to post this response on his behalf – “I imagine I know most of the folks Emilie knows, so I am glad to be in touch and to say that I hope to see each of you by and by, in Baton Rouge, New Orleans, on my front porch knocking at my door in Black Mountain, maybe Denver in a few weeks for AWP, and/or somewhere in the literary world or the firmament above. Fondly remembering, David.” He promised to send London Bridge info soon. Also, if you want to read a summary of David’s work and career that I wrote a few years ago, check out the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture – Vol. 9 Literature.]

While I was writing this, I got an email that Clarence will appear with Ethan Dilsdorf next month as part of the Readers & Writers series, for their 25th anniversary. March 21st at 8:30 p.m. on the LSU campus.

And now, I’ll leave you with a poem, as promised. I did, in fact, get a book of Lucille Clifton’s poetry from the library, Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988-2000. Just before I sat down to write this, I read a few poems, like savoring bon-bons before my work and I was gobsmacked by this one.

why some people be mad at me sometimes
they ask me to remember
but they want me to remember
their memories
and i keep on remembering
mine

[A 2.25.10 P.S./Update: I have now officially hit two new superlative records with the blog’s traffic. Yesterday was my busiest traffic day so far, significantly beating out the previous busiest day, which already made me happy. And, in just the first two months of this year, the blog has already had more traffic than the last 6 months of last year combined. While it might seem like I’m bragging on myself here, I’d actually like to take a moment to thank YOU for helping to grow my blog, for being somewhat interested in what I have to say. I hope to see lots more busiest days and personal records with your help. Thank you for reading.]

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Filed under book news, bragging on, poetry

Hey Dancing Heart

The title of the post is the title of a personal ad I happened to see. I love it, so I’m kinda playing around with it to see what it fits. Because I just have to use it. 🙂

Life’s been kinda chaotic. My temp job came to an end and the very same day (after my going-away party, awwww), I drove up to Baton Rouge for the Louisiana Book Festival. Many of my friends were on panels and Jamey was kind enough to invite me to share her gorgeous hotel room. That first night, we were driven in style to the Author’s Party at the State Library – which was good, because I hadn’t packed for the cold and that’s a bit of a walk from the hotel! We met some really amazing people, caught up with old friends and ate wonderful food from Mansur’s in the stacks of the State Library. There is nothing like witnessing your friends being celebrated, so it was a good night. Jamey and Barb met up with the folks from the Oxford American who’ve published them this year, as well as other writers-including Alex Cook, who not only writes for Oxford American, but 225 Magazine and Country Roads as well. And it turns out we have a decade-past M’s Fine and Mellow Cafe connection, so that was cool. Louis and his wife Elly were there and I got to see my mentor David Madden as well. After we were put into the last cars back to the hotel, some of us decided to go out on the town a bit, though we had to be up early, and that was a blast as well.

The whole time we were at that end of downtown, near the LSU Museum of Art and the hotel, close to the river, I was having fits of nostalgia, some really powerful flashbacks. Nearly ten years ago, the hotel was a ruin and the museum wasn’t there. Downtown was a ghost town after 6 p.m. when all the government workers would flee the encroaching darkness. M’s Fine and Mellow and Tabby’s Blues Box were pretty much the only things open and the year that I became a regular at M’s (every Tuesday, open mic night) was a year of my personal blossoming. I met many of my friends then and there, I forced myself to come out of my shell more. And it really felt like the place was ours, empty and dangerous as it may have been. Now the mural that used to be on the side of M’s is gone, replaced by a painted sign for The Roux House, which occupies the same space. The parking lot I used to park in is the cradle of the gorgeous museum, whose rooftop offers a breathtaking view of the river. Tabby’s is gone and in its place, a club my friend Daniel Lee plays at sometimes, I think. I met Daniel that very first Tuesday I went to M’s, grabbed his hand as he passed by my table and told him how much I liked his music. He thanked me and sat down to talk. These days, downtown Baton Rouge is full of life and it’s great to see. It’s not the same, but it’s still a beautiful thing.

The day of the Book Festival was glorious and overwhelming. I don’t know what voodoo the organizers of the Book Festival do, but there always seems to be gorgeous weather for the festival. Sometimes it’s hot, but as far as I can remember, it’s always been clear. This year, it was chilly with such a crystalline blue sky, you felt like you were walking around in an advertisement.

I had to pop in and out of panels to see everybody, but I feel satisfied with my glimpses and experiences. Barb in the enormous Senate Chamber with Rick Bragg et al for just a few minutes. Then, Louie’s book reading where I ran into a friend who is coincidentally a fan of his and was gratified to hear another reader say, “I picked up your book because of the piece I read in 225…” Then, a thrilling ride in a golf cart with Elly and Louis to the signing tent – Elly and I crying, “Wheeeee!” and urging the driver to go faster on the sidewalks around the Capitol building and Louie trying to act like he didn’t know either of us.

After chatting with Louie and Elly for a few minutes, I wandered around some of the vendor tents, stopping to talk to the great folks who publish me occasionally at 225 Magazine. It was really nice to put a face to the e-mail conversations. I’ve known my editor, Jeff Roedel, since our days in the Cinema Club together at college, but I hadn’t met Tom Guarisco, 225‘s editor, though we’d communicated. One of the downfalls of freelancing, though it’s so great when you get to have a face-to-face. I’d never spoken with Rachael Upton, the online news editor, but I was very pleased to meet with her there at the festival. She does really great work with the website and she just happens to be really nice.

And then it was back into the Capitol building for a whirlwind of panels. A few minutes in the “Humor in Welty” panel that some professors of mine from LSU were on, and then across the hall to Barb’s very intimate reading from her book, More of This World or Maybe Another. She read from the story “Killer Heart,” and there was this one particular line (won’t say which, not out of context) where I felt like she’d reached over and punched me in the stomach. I made an audible sound, a sort of agonized, “Oh,” and that’s probably one of the best compliments I can give a writer. Especially a short story writer because, as I confessed to Barb later that night, I struggle to read and write short stories. There’s something about them that is harder for me than novels. They’re very different beasts. More on Barb and her book in a few paragraphs.

I had to leave Barb’s panel to get to Jamey’s “Work-in-Progress” panel with our teacher Moira Crone and another writer named Maggie Collins. It was really great to hear Moira read her piece. Jamey’s was material I had heard about, but never read (or heard). She prefaced hers by saying that it truly was a work in progress as she’d been working on it that morning at breakfast. I can attest to the truth of that. 🙂

Again, I had to duck out early from the “Works-in-Progress” panel to get to Toni’s panel about the Bobbie Faye books. She was entertaining her crowd with behind the scenes stories about the repackaging of the series and they asked a lot of questions about whether there’d be a fourth Bobbie Faye book (yet to be determined), one reader even going so far as to passionately say, “I think you owe us that story.”

The rest of the day was conversations, drinks and then a long, wonderful dinner. And then a long, not-so-wonderful drive back to New Orleans, getting back late at night/early in the morning, whichever way you look at it. Sunday was a recovery and packing day, catching up two friends for lunch and dinner respectively, before driving to Georgia on Monday.

Tuesday, I attended a press session with some of the Top 10 dancers from Season 5 of So You Think You Can Dance. It’s interesting covering an event as press when you are also a fan of whatever you’re covering. It was hard to be cool and professional when talking to Evan, for instance.  At one point, he was playing lacrosse with one of the tour folks and the ball rolled up a hill to land at my feet. I got to toss it to him and I was giggling girlishly (in my head, oh, I hope it was just in my head) as I tossed it back to him. Hold onto that journalistic integrity with all your strength. You’ve got to, as there’s still something of a prejudice against bloggers (I was there representing Pure SYTYCD, not my personal blog). I think the dancers definitely appreciate the bloggers from the fan sites cause they know their names and stuff about the show – also, as “my boys” (Phillip, Jason and Evan) pointed out, one of the recent fan site bloggers knew a lot of stuff that was going on with the tour that only the dancers knew!

Also, an advantage of blogging? Immediacy. A disadvantage at times, maybe. But, that day, total advantage. I was able to go to a nearby Kroger with a Starbucks (and wifi) and upload the pictures I’d just taken for our readers. Check out the post I did that afternoon here. I’ve been struggling on a book for years that relatively few people have seen, so it’s nice to have something in my life that I can write and have thousands of people see immediately. It’s helpful to have some instant gratification in my life and career.

It was another long day as Mamma Mia! met me at the Arena for the show that evening and the show itself was several (wonderful) hours. And then, being the total dorks and enormous fans that we are, we stayed afterwards (hours in the cold) for the meet and greet with the dancers. All of the dancers I’d met that afternoon remembered me when we met late that night. Unfortunately, most of my pictures didn’t turn out all that well, but I had some good conversations I will always remember and I did get a picture of Evan’s and my almost-matching wrist tattoos. It was both a freelance opportunity and a great bonding experience with Mamma Mia! Lyndsey Parker (Reality Rocks) set a great precedent when she took her mom to the American Idol finale. Take your mom to work, payback for all those “take your daughter to work” days growing up. 🙂

And then, of course, we got to watch the Top 20 announcement episode together the next night. Had dinner with high school friends and their daughter my last night in town and then rocketed back to New Orleans on Friday – especially for a book party for Barb.

Let me say one more time – it’s a wonderful thing to see your friends celebrated and no one deserves it more than Barb. Hosted at a gorgeous Midcity home right off the bayou, the event was simply breathtaking, what each and every one of us can aspire to one day. Reward for finishing and publishing our books. Earlier in the day, I’d been reading More of This World or Maybe Another at Cheers and Barb’s story “If the Holy Spirit Comes For You” made me cry in public. If you can make me laugh out loud on buses or cry in my local coffeeshop, you have completely moved me, sucked me into your world and, as I said earlier, that is the highest compliment I can pay a writer. I was so mad at the characters in that story and so mad at Barb for pulling all these emotions through my skin (painfully) and out of my body with her words. But apparently, it’s great advertisement for her brilliance because my neighbor S. saw how upset I was and when I told her why I’d been crying, she said, “I can’t wait to read that book!”

And that pretty much brings us up to date, to now. I’ve fallen out of the habit of being at Cheers everyday [:(] and today, just now, I noticed that they painted over the bathroom graffiti. It was really disorienting and kinda sad. But then, I just told myself – it’s a blank slate, a clean canvas. Like my book. What was there was great, but what will be there will be better. And I can’t wait to see what it will be.

Two people at the festival told me, “it’s your turn soon, to sit over there and sign books.” I have to take their faith in me and make it my own. And do the freaking work.

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Filed under bragging on, family, freelance work, Friends, So You Think You Can Dance, writing updates

Fess Up Friday (the short hair edition)

That’s right, I have chopped off my hair for Locks of Love, the official summer hair cut. When I get a pic I like, I’ll maybe switch it out so everybody can see. I’ve gotten “Amelie,” “retro,” and “babydoll” as comments, if that gives you any idea.

Wasn’t sick at all this week, but I did somehow lock myself out of my bedroom while I was in my pajamas. Thank goodness for those painters and their paint knife after my letter opener broke.

So, I’m doing better with cutting down on my t.v., though I did watch AI and I have to say that, all respect to Danny Gokey, but the voters got it right with Adam and Kris. And Kris! He totally showed Adam up, which I didn’t think was possible. I had just been saying that though I love both “Heartless” and “Blame It on the Alcohol,” both songs were pretty silly performed live on AI. A lot of posturing and rough negotiating with all of the synths or whatever. And as if he heard me, Kris performed an acoustic “Heartless.” Whoa! Freaking whoa! And not only was it just a freaking great arrangement, it also demonstrated how amazing the lyrics are (that was clear in the original, but with a stripped-down version, they just jumped out at you). So even though I was unfortunately wrong with the top 3, I was spot on about the top 2. And you know what? Kris could win this, he really could. And Adam’s gonna have an amazing career no matter what, so it’s all gravy.

But you know what I’ve been overdosing on this week? Reading! I read 3 young adult books in like 2 days. The last, Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games, I read pretty much straight through last night/this morning. Thought I’d read a chapter as I was trying to fall asleep and got so consumed with the story, just had to know what happened, that I read until I finished at 5:31 this morning. And of course, it’s the first in the series and of course the next isn’t coming out till September. Oh, how will I ever wait to find out what happens next? Somebody send me an ARC! So even though my site says I’m reading, The Song Is You and that is true, I’m usually reading like five or six things at once. But The Hunger Games. Seriously, read this book. It is inventive and brutal and gorgeous, about a future society in North America that sends 24 “tributes” from its 12 districts to fight until only one survives. I love how some of the best characters in these brutal future-society books (think John Marsden’s Tomorrow series) are kick ass girls like Ripley and Barbara.

The socializing – I’m still doing quite a bit of that. Drove up to Baton Rouge for an “Electric Ladies” lunch celebrating David Madden (see pic) and went to Bud’s Broiler for the first time and the Insectarium. Overall, however, I’m doing pretty good at saying no to invitations (sorry!!!! I promise I’ll be less of a hermit soon!!!).

But that’s enough about how I’m failing to use my time wisely. Let me update you on all the progress I’ve made.

New words:

5.10 = 1,547 (3 scenes)
5.11 = 3,179 (2 scenes)
5.12 = 613 (1 scene)
5.13 = 558 (1/2 scene)
5.14 = 599 (2nd 1/2 scene)

But it’s not all about new words. I actually generated a significant amount of new words and scenes since last October, in preparation for filling out the parts that needed more. I have one complete draft and lots of loose material to work with. So the greatest part of the work I’ve been doing has been splicing the new work and the old material together, or editing. So, how’s this for linear thinking – I made an enormous jump and I have about 180 pages “done.” I’ll continue with my splicing and hope to have a few days or a full week at the end to do one more pass to make everything connect and work the way I’d like it to. Makes the book sound like a machine, doesn’t it?

During all the test runs I’ve taken it on, the book is performing well. Just like a top-end sports car, purring and growling enthusiastically, just revving up to show off what it can do. A friend recently asked me how the writing was going and for the first time in a long time, I didn’t sigh and shake my head and offer a lot of excuses. I grinned and chirped, “Great!” And meant it. That feels so good.

Toni sponsored a book-giveaway on my blog. Someday I’ll be more democratic with my book-giveaways, but this time instead of making y’all work for it, I gave the books to people I knew would love them. So the copy of Allison Brennan‘s Sudden Death went to Pam Gauxtreaux and the copies of Toni’s first two books (they’re gonna be re-released this summer under new titles) went to Kristin Sanders.

So, to conclude, a few items that grabbed my attention this week:

This is a GREAT idea (Amazon to reprint books).

This makes me incredibly sad (Coconut Beach).

And this is fascinating (Dan Baum, New Yorker, a story told on Twitter).

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Maybe I was a better writer when I was 10

Here’s the proof of what I say:
When I was 10, what I’d rather do than write = nothing.
Now that I’m not 10 anymore, what I’d rather do than write = anything, it seems.

Downloading music, talking to strangers in a coffeeshop, blogging, linking to just about any site on the right, reading other people’s books which are “safe,” cleaning my toilet (yeah, really).

Why I am currently procrastinating: I’m writing the LONGEST scene ever in my book, knowing that half or all of it will probably go but it must be written. I’m almost done, which means the scene is at its hardest. In a way, beyond its disposability, it’s one of the most important scenes. It’s where a new character sees the circus performance for the first time. It’s probably the only time in my book (about the circus) where a full show will be depicted. And thank goodness.

I have been writing TCB (The Current Book) since 2004 when it began as a short story in David Madden’s classroom. There is an entire draft that is done (aka: Thesis) and I am rewriting the entire thing virtually from scratch. Almost everything from that first short story is gone, has been gone. It’s the craziest, bravest, most necessary thing I’ve ever done. I have about 70 pages of the new draft and I’m so unbelievably happy with the direction this version is going except that it’s coming along very slowly.

So I’ve been in this coffeeshop (aka “Cheers”) for going on 6 hours and I haven’t written word one on this tough scene. This is one for Fess Up Friday, even if it’s not Friday yet. I’m logging out of this new delicious blog and I’m shutting down the Internet and I’m going to write. Dammit.

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