Tag Archives: Gambit

All Things Brag

Forgive me, it has been two months since my last brag. More than two months. This post is long overdue. The good news when it takes me a while to post is that there’s more to talk about. But that’s also the challenge, too, keeping track of everything.

Shortly after my last bragging post, my interview with Ronlyn Domingue for 225 went live. Ronlyn and I talked for over an hour and pretty much every word out of her mouth was quotable. It was a great problem to have and a wonderful challenge to shape the interview.

Fellow tango dancer, also aerialist and circus performer, Elise Duran was featured in DIG, a Baton Rouge magazine. It’s a great piece and has phenomenal photos of Elise performing.

Brent Newsom has a poem up at PANK Magazine, “Smyrna.” He also tweets. Check him out.

Solimar Otero has a book out, Afro-Cuban Diasporas in the Atlantic World.

In the Mind of the Maker is a documentary by C.E. Richard, a fabulous filmmaker who I was lucky enough to study with at LSU. The film will debut internationally next year. Keep an eye on the website and check out the trailer.

Chicago tango dancer Katya Kulik has a short story called “Verify Your Humanity” on The Newer York’s Electric Encyclopedia of Experimental Fiction.

Karin C. Davidson’s two-part interview with Andrew Lam is up at Hothouse and it’s a must-read. Also, his Huffington Post essays.

One of my tango instructors, Ector Gutierrez appeared on Good Morning New Orleans with Katarina Boudreaux as his partner.

Joselyn Takacs is a finalist in Narrative Magazine’s Winter 2013 contest for her story “The New River.”

Lindsay Rae Spurlock has a new single on iTunes called “You, Baby.”

Missy Wilkinson received an award from the Council of Drug and Alcohol Abuse for a Gambit article she wrote on addiction as a brain disease. She also has an essay about being a in a cult over at xojane.com.

Mary McMyne has three poems over at Painted Bride Quarterly, two poems at Waccamaw, and one poem in The Way North, an anthology from Wayne State University.

Montana Miller has become an accomplished skydiver over the last few years and recently participated in some big-way formations, including the 125-way Perris Flower formation. In her message, she said, “On our second jump, though, when I had almost given up hope that we would ever manage to get everyone to perform their best at the same time, we actually did it! And not only that, we held it for SEVEN SECONDS, which is amazing.” Because of her consistent and stellar performance in formations like these, she was invited to participate in the Arizona Challenge, which I’m told is the most elite and selective skydiving event.

Maureen Foley’s book Women Float is available now.

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Kelly Harris has this great “What Are You Reading” post on Bayou Magazine‘s blog. Ted O’Brien from Garden District Book Shop has a “What Are you Reading” the next month. I love this series.

Speaking of Bayou’s blog, they also have a great review of the Sunday Shorts series co-hosted by MelaNated Writers Collective and Peauxdunque Writers Alliance. Over at the Peauxdunque blog, Tad was, as he always is with Peauxdunque news, very good at covering this series, which matched a MelaNated writer with a Peauxdunque writer each week for a month.  I’ll include some of my pictures from the series here.

Now You See Me, a film that consumed a lot of my time in 2011 and 2012, is out in theaters now. I met so many awesome folks on that show and have lots of great memories. Among my takeaways: several decks of cards and the ability to do a one-handed cut, which the magic consultant, David Kwong, taught me. At a friend’s bridal shower, I won a joke deck of cards, so what did I do? I proceeded to teach everyone at the shower the one-handed cut (and they all learned more quickly than I did). The multiple trailers leading up to NYSM’s release drove me crazy till I could finally see it, with a co-worker from the movie, the bride from the aforementioned shower and her now-husband. We had a lot of fun watching it together. Check out one of the trailers:

My aunt, Ruth Staat, completed her first 5K run/walk (in 18 minutes)!

James Claffey‘s latest publications include: fled the tightening rope at the For Every Year Project, green their dead eyes at Blue Fifth Review.

Lee Ware has a story up at Connotation Press.

Quite a few folks graduated or started school recently, which is really exciting. At UNO’s awards banquet, both Che Yeun (Ernest and Shirley Svenson Fiction Award for her story “Yuna”) and Maurice Ruffin (Joanna Leake Prize for Fiction Thesis for his collection It’s Good to See You’re Awake) were honored. Che is also the Stanley Elkin Scholarship recipient for the 2013 Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Maurice also has an essay about New Orleans East
over at New Orleans & Me.

The UNO MFA students and WWOZ have teamed up for UNO Storyville, recordings of the students’ true-life experiences in New Orleans. They ran a successful Kickstarter campaign to fund the project, so check it out.

Speaking of successful Kickstarter campaigns, let me tell you about three more. Mark Landry, a cohort from the Cinema Club (waaay back in my LSU years) and friends launched a campaign to put out a graphic novel called Bloodthirsty: One Nation Under Water. This is a truly fascinating project and I love that Mark lays out how it came together on the Kickstarter campaign page.

Summer Literary Seminars, which brought me to St. Petersburg, Russia in 2007, launched a campaign to publish LitVak, a collection of writing and photography from SLS faculty and students. They made their goal, so look for the anthology.

And last, Helen Krieger’s Kickstarter campaign for the second season of Least Favorite Love Songs is wrapping up in 37 hours. They’ve already met their minimum goal and then some ($7,000+ at last check) and they’re aiming for $10,000 so they can pay their crew a nominal amount. They have major swag at low contributor levels, so it pays to back them. You can watch all of season one for free here.

Whew! That’ll teach me to wait so long between brags!

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Filed under book news, bragging on, family, Friends, movies, music, New Orleans Film Industry, poetry, pop culture

Vigilante Gift Shop – another Banksy/street art post

Last year, I wrote a giant post that mostly discussed street art in general and Banksy in specific. It bounced around a few topics that seemed related to me and was at least loosely connected – street art, Banksy, my volleyball teammates, my time in St. Petersburg, Russia with SLS. Before I wrote that post, I was lucky if I got 20-30 hits a day on this blog, but since then, I’ve seen a leap in traffic and searches like “banksy,” “banksy pictures,” and “robin banksy.” Most of the searches are pretty standard, though there was a few of “бАНКСЫ" searches and I did see an odd one recently – “gross vandalism art.”  Kinda intriguing.

Earlier this year, I revisited the idea of street art, particularly one of the images I’d included in that first post and the story of a friend of mine’s mural.

I’ve been meaning to write a true follow-up to the first street art post, because I stumbled on a lot of new information (and street art) since then. Where do I start?

Let’s start with New Orleans. In my first post, I linked to articles about Banksy’s visit to New Orleans and showed pictures of some of the work he did here. He mocked the “Gray Ghost,” who is a guy named Fred Radtke who paints over graffiti and street art. I’ve since found this piece that asks if there might be more than one “Gray Ghost,” if the Ghost has his own ghost. It raises the question of what distinguishes art from crime:

“Has its original intention been blotted out by Radtke’s approach, which some consider overzealous and unchecked that makes no distinctions between art and vandalism, or is he being unfairly criticized for what most would agree is a dirty job?”

Around the same time I first read this Gambit article, I found the website and trailer for Vigilante Vigilante, a film that looks at three men, including the Gray Ghost of New Orleans, who have made it their mission to “buff out” street art. Watch the trailer, it looks pretty amazing:

And of course, I found out about the documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop, about Banksy taking over the documentary a guy was trying to make about him. I’ve been waiting eagerly to see it. When our most arty theater, Canal Theaters, was under construction, I thought there was no way I’d get to see it on the big screen. Then, oddly enough, a friend discovered it was playing at the recently renovated and re-opened Chalmette Theaters. This theater, like most everything else in Chalmette, was destroyed during Katrina. And it wasn’t easy to figure out where this theater is or what the showtimes were, let me tell you. My friend and I and a co-worker all had to investigate and then, of course, I had to drive out in a rainstorm to Chalmette, not really knowing my way. Anyway, I’d do it all again because it was an awesome experience. It should be said that the Chalmette Theaters is open, but only just. When I first walked in, I obviously walked in the side that’s not yet renovated and open for business. It was a big empty shell. When I found my way out and inside the open side of the theater, everything was glitzy and great, still smelling of fresh paint. It was, for that surreal reason alone, probably the best possible place I could’ve seen Exit Through the Gift Shop.

I shared the theater with one other patron, a completely unexpected middle-aged white guy, which just goes to show my own expectations and prejudices. We said hi as took my seat a few minutes before showtime, but didn’t speak again through the movie. I loved that the opening included a shot of the giant “YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL” on the back of an abandoned building near NOCCA, on the river. Check out one of my pictures, below:

Abandoned building on the river, near NOCCA

The movie was absorbing and really smart. I only wished it had something about Banky’s visit to New Orleans. Anyway, I don’t want to give too much away by detailing everything that happens, but if you’re a geek for street art like me, it’ll be your thing. When it was over, my mind was reeling. Me and the unexpected middle-aged white guy walked out together and had a tiny conversation about what we thought of the film and I left feeling freaked out, amused and very excited about street art, about New Orleans (and Chalmette) and re-inspired by Banksy all over again.

You know, some people grumble that he’s sold out, is selling out, or has always been a sellout since it’s likely he’s an upper middle class British guy. And I wonder, sometimes. Especially when I read something like this short Artnet piece:

BANKSY DOES $200K BAND BACKDROP
Everyone’s talking about the Banksy-directed film, Exit through the Gift Shop, which showed at the Sundance Film Festival and tracks the antics of street artist Mr. Brainwash. Also getting some press: the London band named Exit through the Gift Shop, which has understandably benefited from some free publicity. The similarity in names was apparently a coincidence, with the band having been founded a few years ago out of the “midlife crisis” of band member, 41-year-old web developer Simon Duncan.

Call it a happy coincidence though. According to the Guardian, Duncan’s band started receiving “hilarious emails from someone saying he was Banksy,” asking for them to change their name. Soon, in return for changing his band’s name to Brace Yourself, a white van delivered to Duncan a giant new Banksy painting — “the size of a double bed” — depicting a grim reaper driving a bumper car, with the words “Brace Yourself” written on the front.

A Sotheby’s appraiser estimated that the work is worth a cool $200,000, and has taken the original into storage. Brace Yourself plans to play in front of a full-sized replica of the Banksy at a gig this week.

That’s kinda a big corporation move, to demand that somebody change their name because it closely resembles that name of your project. Yet, I guess Banksy wasn’t exactly demanding, he was asking, as the piece says. And, not only did he gift them with a $200,000 piece of art, he linked his name to their band and provided media exposure. I, for one, wouldn’t know anything about this band if not for a having read this write-up.

So, knowing I was going to do a follow-up, I did a couple of searches to see what’s going on currently. As always, I found some really cool stuff to read and look at. Like the Tumblr page that’s constantly being updated with pictures people have tagged. And the photos from Banksy’s tour of New York. And this piece about a “graffiti war” between Banksy and Team Robbo, who are going behind Banksy and altering his pieces. Kinda like Jenn’s mural being tagged by someone else, like I mentioned in my “Reconsidered” post. And this YouTube video, which is interesting in and of itself, because it might as well be a guided tour of a museum, except the curator is a kid explaining a “graff war”:

Which kinda brings me back full circle again. In my first post, I tried to find something to indicate whether or not Banksy had been to Russia, especially St. Petersburg, where I found a lot of amazing street art. Well, I found this great image from Russia, probably St. Petersburg, actually.

And then this great article on the English Russia site about the “Ukranian Banksy.” Some really great stuff, here. My favorite may be this one:

The "Ukranian Banksy"

And I think this is the best bit. It’d old news, but I hadn’t heard of it. The Cans Festival of public street art where spectators were encouraged to bring spray cans and wear clothes they didn’t mind getting dirty. I think every city should do this regularly. Would be really cool. Here’s my favorite of the pieces featured in the article:

Anyway, so that’s a lot of photographs and videos, just like the first post. I kinda get lost down the rabbit hole once I start talking about this stuff. I’ll leave you with my new favorite Banksy:

my new favorite Banksy

And some street art/graffiti images I’ve seen around New Orleans lately.

On the same building as "YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL"

Exemplifies our attitude in New Orleans, I think.

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Filed under art, movies, New Orleans, pop culture, Uncategorized

Hubig’s in Gambit

Just read the cover story in the newest Gambit, which is on the survival of Hubig’s Pies, despite (or because of?) their insistence on doing things as they always have, for over 80 years. I was lucky enough to visit the factory in the Marigny several times and was once given an informal tour. Reading Katie van Syckle’s story evoked the place and process pretty well. When she says “The atmosphere on the factory floor is light and jovial as employees joke with each other and their manager” (pg 24), that’s actually been true of my experiences visiting, too. 🙂

But the pies themselves? Just sinfully good. They’re so rich, I usually can’t finish one myself (though they’re not full-size pies, never fear), so they’re a great thing to share. I remember, at a football party, eating warmed up sections of the pies and that was really yummy, to try lots of different flavors. I like peach and apple a lot, and chocolate’s really good too.

If you don’t live in New Orleans, you can order Hubig’s. A little bite of fattening, glorious New Orleans straight to your door. 🙂

[I’ll link to the story online, when and if I can find it on the Gambit website.]

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Filed under New Orleans, pop culture